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Secretary-General's Report to the Security Council

The present document provides the Security Council with an updated
assessment of the state of the negotiations in Cyprus since the Secretary-General's previous report
(S/2011/498 – August 2011).

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Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, 17 March 2015

 

EBE-EROGLU-TRANS
 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, 17 March  2015

 

 

We are now all seeing, you know I also saw Mr Anastasiades today. I think we have a shared sense that we are about to come out of the hydrocarbons’ crisis as we knew it and the circumstance will soon be such that we will be able to declare the resumption of talks. I am not doing that right now because there are still some things that have to happen but I think that we are seeing that this spring will be much more promising than last autumn. With weather and spring I think we can take some optimism and say that maybe we will not only be back on track, but actually be able to accelerate talks and have faster process than what we originally planned.
I want to reiterate this thing has to be agreed and declared, but my sense is that there is a will on both sides to make sure that this is possible within relatively short time. I am talking about a number of weeks, not months.    
 
Q: You are [inaudible] and proceed as it has to be, but the most important thing is how the [inaudible] will overcome the hydrocarbons’ crisis. What do you bring with you here?    
A: Well, as you know the current NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April and NAVTEX of course was from the Turkish Cypriot side, a response to other activities. It seems that without going too much into detail, it seems that the whole picture will be such that we will have a climate where we are going back to talks based on the initial positions of both sides, will be possible within weeks or at least before the course of this spring. And what I am pushing for is, when the sides come back; they come back with a shared will to make it happen – to actually dedicate themselves to serious negotiations, fast negotiations, accelerated phase and try to overcome even the most difficult issues, so that later this year and in a number of months we will be able to sum up and see this is where we are and this is what is possible. And I know that there is significant international support from, I would say all relevant quarters, to make that happen. While I’ve not being so much here in Cyprus over the last weeks, I have been elsewhere and preparing for this and it looks promising.
Again, let me be very clear we are not there yet, so what I am saying what my sense is, but my sense is a qualified sense of optimism that spring will bring new times to the Cyprus problem.
 
Q: Do you have also a sense about the timetable of the negotiations.
A: I do, but I think that this is something that this is something that I will not finalize when the conditions are there as I described, we should first agree to have a meeting, then we will have a meeting and then we will agree on exactly how it is organized and I think I leave that for then. But I can tell you what I would like in not only we get back quickly, but then when we are back we are structured, systematic, dedicated and sustained without interruptions to see how far we can go. I want to say again and I have said this many times, so I am repeating myself because sometimes it is necessary, there are many difficult issues that we will be facing. In any negotiations that I have ever seen or I have been involved in, there will be or seemed to be crisis and interruptions and so on, but I don’t see anything in the Cyprob which is not solvable. If there is will on both sides. If there is will, all the issues can be solved through some kind of compromise or joint understanding. And I remain convinced that both sides actually want a solution, even if it is challenging to get there and this is what keeps me optimistic and far more optimistic from my last visit.          

 

END

 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades, 17 March 2015

 

EBE-NA-TRANS
 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades, 17 March 2015

I am very happy to be here, I had an excellent meeting with Mr Anastasiades. I think there is a growing sense that the circumstances that led to the suspension of the talks may soon be over. We of course need to see that that is a fact before we can move on but expectations are that within reasonable time we will be able to get back to a climate where we can not only talk again but maybe even see if that talks can be accelerated.
And I feel that there is a wish and desire to now invest in this, after the crisis we have had. Sometimes crises can help clarify people's mind and illustrate that there are bigger issues out there that we will have to meet together. So, I am significantly more optimistic than last time you saw me.
Q: When do you foresee things starting to pick up?
A: As you know the NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April so that is one factor which would contribute constructively to the resumption of talks and also all the developments in the gas sector seems now to move in such a director that we may have a climate where talks can continue.
Q1: Which direction is that?
Q2: What do you mean by that?
It seems that a window maybe created where the mutual reasons for what has happened over winter are not there and if that momentum occurs we will use it. What we are trying to do now is to talk about what we will do if this is possible. Assuming that we are moving into a better space then we will accelerate talks and try to see how far we can get.
Q: You mean a mutual cessation?
A: No I don't talk about any agreed mutual cessation I am just looking at the different factors that are out there anyway.
Q: The window is small, but what if ENI-Kogas starts working after its maintenance is done?
A: I only recognize that given the developments in the gas market, where as you know the gas prices are low and so far the findings are not being particularly promising. This is not something that is really up to me to comment much on, but my sense is that can create, give us some time to get back to the talks and then of course when we are talking, the main purpose is not only to deal with technical issues but to create the climate; that means in the future we will not have the same need to move out of the talks.
Q: I am referring to something you said publically a few month ago, that this could be a last chance for the talks in the sense that will be the last chance for a bi-zonal bi-communal federation. Do you still believe that?
A: My point now is that I think we have a chance, there is a real chance. I think people have to realize that we cannot go on year after year without any progress, because this problem has remained unresolved for many decades.
Four or five depending on how you count, and I am not going to take a position on that, but several decades and generations, and hence at some stage there must be share will to move on. I actually feel that this will is there. I just feel that in addition to the will there must be the right circumstances and if these circumstances occur we must be ready to grasp the opportunity and use it constructively. This is what I just talked to Mr. Anastasiades about.
Q: Is this the last chance?
A: There will not be many more chances, put it that way.
 
END

 

SASG Eide briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Cyprus, 26 January 2015

 

EBE-Council

 

SASG Eide briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Cyprus, 26 January 2015
 

 Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide briefed the Security Council at UN Headquarters on the state-of-play in the negotiations on 26 January 2015. The Council expressed its strong support for SASG Eide's efforts, noted the importance of a conducive environment and called for the resumption of structured negotiations without delay. http://bit.ly/15CKroX

 

Security Council calls for resumption of structured negotiations without delay

On 29 January, the United Nations Security Council voted to renew the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months. The resolution adopted by the Council also expressed support for the ongoing efforts of the Secretary-General's Special Adviser on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide. Noting the importance of a conducive environment, the Council called for a resumption of structured negotiations without delay.

 You can read Security Council Resolution 2197 of 2015 here: http://bit.ly/1DdWYtQ

66842015-03-24 10:01:00.0Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, 17 March 2015

 

EBE-EROGLU-TRANS 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, 17 March  2015 

 

 

We are now all seeing, you know I also saw Mr Anastasiades today. I think we have a shared sense that we are about to come out of the hydrocarbons’ crisis as we knew it and the circumstance will soon be such that we will be able to declare the resumption of talks. I am not doing that right now because there are still some things that have to happen but I think that we are seeing that this spring will be much more promising than last autumn. With weather and spring I think we can take some optimism and say that maybe we will not only be back on track, but actually be able to accelerate talks and have faster process than what we originally planned.
I want to reiterate this thing has to be agreed and declared, but my sense is that there is a will on both sides to make sure that this is possible within relatively short time. I am talking about a number of weeks, not months.    
 
Q: You are [inaudible] and proceed as it has to be, but the most important thing is how the [inaudible] will overcome the hydrocarbons’ crisis. What do you bring with you here?    
A: Well, as you know the current NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April and NAVTEX of course was from the Turkish Cypriot side, a response to other activities. It seems that without going too much into detail, it seems that the whole picture will be such that we will have a climate where we are going back to talks based on the initial positions of both sides, will be possible within weeks or at least before the course of this spring. And what I am pushing for is, when the sides come back; they come back with a shared will to make it happen – to actually dedicate themselves to serious negotiations, fast negotiations, accelerated phase and try to overcome even the most difficult issues, so that later this year and in a number of months we will be able to sum up and see this is where we are and this is what is possible. And I know that there is significant international support from, I would say all relevant quarters, to make that happen. While I’ve not being so much here in Cyprus over the last weeks, I have been elsewhere and preparing for this and it looks promising.
Again, let me be very clear we are not there yet, so what I am saying what my sense is, but my sense is a qualified sense of optimism that spring will bring new times to the Cyprus problem.
 
Q: Do you have also a sense about the timetable of the negotiations.
A: I do, but I think that this is something that this is something that I will not finalize when the conditions are there as I described, we should first agree to have a meeting, then we will have a meeting and then we will agree on exactly how it is organized and I think I leave that for then. But I can tell you what I would like in not only we get back quickly, but then when we are back we are structured, systematic, dedicated and sustained without interruptions to see how far we can go. I want to say again and I have said this many times, so I am repeating myself because sometimes it is necessary, there are many difficult issues that we will be facing. In any negotiations that I have ever seen or I have been involved in, there will be or seemed to be crisis and interruptions and so on, but I don’t see anything in the Cyprob which is not solvable. If there is will on both sides. If there is will, all the issues can be solved through some kind of compromise or joint understanding. And I remain convinced that both sides actually want a solution, even if it is challenging to get there and this is what keeps me optimistic and far more optimistic from my last visit.          
END
 

 

EBE-EROGLU-TRANS
 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, 17 March  2015

 

 

We are now all seeing, you know I also saw Mr Anastasiades today. I think we have a shared sense that we are about to come out of the hydrocarbons’ crisis as we knew it and the circumstance will soon be such that we will be able to declare the resumption of talks. I am not doing that right now because there are still some things that have to happen but I think that we are seeing that this spring will be much more promising than last autumn. With weather and spring I think we can take some optimism and say that maybe we will not only be back on track, but actually be able to accelerate talks and have faster process than what we originally planned.
I want to reiterate this thing has to be agreed and declared, but my sense is that there is a will on both sides to make sure that this is possible within relatively short time. I am talking about a number of weeks, not months.    
 
Q: You are [inaudible] and proceed as it has to be, but the most important thing is how the [inaudible] will overcome the hydrocarbons’ crisis. What do you bring with you here?    
A: Well, as you know the current NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April and NAVTEX of course was from the Turkish Cypriot side, a response to other activities. It seems that without going too much into detail, it seems that the whole picture will be such that we will have a climate where we are going back to talks based on the initial positions of both sides, will be possible within weeks or at least before the course of this spring. And what I am pushing for is, when the sides come back; they come back with a shared will to make it happen – to actually dedicate themselves to serious negotiations, fast negotiations, accelerated phase and try to overcome even the most difficult issues, so that later this year and in a number of months we will be able to sum up and see this is where we are and this is what is possible. And I know that there is significant international support from, I would say all relevant quarters, to make that happen. While I’ve not being so much here in Cyprus over the last weeks, I have been elsewhere and preparing for this and it looks promising.
Again, let me be very clear we are not there yet, so what I am saying what my sense is, but my sense is a qualified sense of optimism that spring will bring new times to the Cyprus problem.
 
Q: Do you have also a sense about the timetable of the negotiations.
A: I do, but I think that this is something that this is something that I will not finalize when the conditions are there as I described, we should first agree to have a meeting, then we will have a meeting and then we will agree on exactly how it is organized and I think I leave that for then. But I can tell you what I would like in not only we get back quickly, but then when we are back we are structured, systematic, dedicated and sustained without interruptions to see how far we can go. I want to say again and I have said this many times, so I am repeating myself because sometimes it is necessary, there are many difficult issues that we will be facing. In any negotiations that I have ever seen or I have been involved in, there will be or seemed to be crisis and interruptions and so on, but I don’t see anything in the Cyprob which is not solvable. If there is will on both sides. If there is will, all the issues can be solved through some kind of compromise or joint understanding. And I remain convinced that both sides actually want a solution, even if it is challenging to get there and this is what keeps me optimistic and far more optimistic from my last visit.          

 

END

 

65812015-03-24 10:00:00.0Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades, 17 March 2015

 

EBE-NA-TRANS 

 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades, 17 March 2015 

I am very happy to be here, I had an excellent meeting with Mr Anastasiades. I think there is a growing sense that the circumstances that led to the suspension of the talks may soon be over. We of course need to see that that is a fact before we can move on but expectations are that within reasonable time we will be able to get back to a climate where we can not only talk again but maybe even see if that talks can be accelerated.
And I feel that there is a wish and desire to now invest in this, after the crisis we have had. Sometimes crises can help clarify people's mind and illustrate that there are bigger issues out there that we will have to meet together. So, I am significantly more optimistic than last time you saw me.
Q: When do you foresee things starting to pick up?
A: As you know the NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April so that is one factor which would contribute constructively to the resumption of talks and also all the developments in the gas sector seems now to move in such a director that we may have a climate where talks can continue.
Q1: Which direction is that?
Q2: What do you mean by that?
It seems that a window maybe created where the mutual reasons for what has happened over winter are not there and if that momentum occurs we will use it. What we are trying to do now is to talk about what we will do if this is possible. Assuming that we are moving into a better space then we will accelerate talks and try to see how far we can get.
Q: You mean a mutual cessation?
A: No I don't talk about any agreed mutual cessation I am just looking at the different factors that are out there anyway.
Q: The window is small, but what if ENI-Kogas starts working after its maintenance is done?
A: I only recognize that given the developments in the gas market, where as you know the gas prices are low and so far the findings are not being particularly promising. This is not something that is really up to me to comment much on, but my sense is that can create, give us some time to get back to the talks and then of course when we are talking, the main purpose is not only to deal with technical issues but to create the climate; that means in the future we will not have the same need to move out of the talks.
Q: I am referring to something you said publically a few month ago, that this could be a last chance for the talks in the sense that will be the last chance for a bi-zonal bi-communal federation. Do you still believe that?
A: My point now is that I think we have a chance, there is a real chance. I think people have to realize that we cannot go on year after year without any progress, because this problem has remained unresolved for many decades.
Four or five depending on how you count, and I am not going to take a position on that, but several decades and generations, and hence at some stage there must be share will to move on. I actually feel that this will is there. I just feel that in addition to the will there must be the right circumstances and if these circumstances occur we must be ready to grasp the opportunity and use it constructively. This is what I just talked to Mr. Anastasiades about.
Q: Is this the last chance?
A: There will not be many more chances, put it that way.
 
END
 

 

EBE-NA-TRANS
 

Transcript of Special Adviser interview with media, following his meeting with Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades, 17 March 2015

I am very happy to be here, I had an excellent meeting with Mr Anastasiades. I think there is a growing sense that the circumstances that led to the suspension of the talks may soon be over. We of course need to see that that is a fact before we can move on but expectations are that within reasonable time we will be able to get back to a climate where we can not only talk again but maybe even see if that talks can be accelerated.
And I feel that there is a wish and desire to now invest in this, after the crisis we have had. Sometimes crises can help clarify people's mind and illustrate that there are bigger issues out there that we will have to meet together. So, I am significantly more optimistic than last time you saw me.
Q: When do you foresee things starting to pick up?
A: As you know the NAVTEX expires on the 6th of April so that is one factor which would contribute constructively to the resumption of talks and also all the developments in the gas sector seems now to move in such a director that we may have a climate where talks can continue.
Q1: Which direction is that?
Q2: What do you mean by that?
It seems that a window maybe created where the mutual reasons for what has happened over winter are not there and if that momentum occurs we will use it. What we are trying to do now is to talk about what we will do if this is possible. Assuming that we are moving into a better space then we will accelerate talks and try to see how far we can get.
Q: You mean a mutual cessation?
A: No I don't talk about any agreed mutual cessation I am just looking at the different factors that are out there anyway.
Q: The window is small, but what if ENI-Kogas starts working after its maintenance is done?
A: I only recognize that given the developments in the gas market, where as you know the gas prices are low and so far the findings are not being particularly promising. This is not something that is really up to me to comment much on, but my sense is that can create, give us some time to get back to the talks and then of course when we are talking, the main purpose is not only to deal with technical issues but to create the climate; that means in the future we will not have the same need to move out of the talks.
Q: I am referring to something you said publically a few month ago, that this could be a last chance for the talks in the sense that will be the last chance for a bi-zonal bi-communal federation. Do you still believe that?
A: My point now is that I think we have a chance, there is a real chance. I think people have to realize that we cannot go on year after year without any progress, because this problem has remained unresolved for many decades.
Four or five depending on how you count, and I am not going to take a position on that, but several decades and generations, and hence at some stage there must be share will to move on. I actually feel that this will is there. I just feel that in addition to the will there must be the right circumstances and if these circumstances occur we must be ready to grasp the opportunity and use it constructively. This is what I just talked to Mr. Anastasiades about.
Q: Is this the last chance?
A: There will not be many more chances, put it that way.
 
END

 

65762015-01-30 10:00:00.0SASG Eide briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Cyprus, 26 January 2015

EBE-Council

 

SASG Eide briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Cyprus, 26 January 2015
 

 Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide briefed the Security Council at UN Headquarters on the state-of-play in the negotiations on 26 January 2015. The Council expressed its strong support for SASG Eide's efforts, noted the importance of a conducive environment and called for the resumption of structured negotiations without delay. http://bit.ly/15CKroX

 

Security Council calls for resumption of structured negotiations without delay

On 29 January, the United Nations Security Council voted to renew the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months. The resolution adopted by the Council also expressed support for the ongoing efforts of the Secretary-General's Special Adviser on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide. Noting the importance of a conducive environment, the Council called for a resumption of structured negotiations without delay.

 You can read Security Council Resolution 2197 of 2015 here: http://bit.ly/1DdWYtQ

 

EBE-Council

 

SASG Eide briefs the UN Security Council on the situation in Cyprus, 26 January 2015
 

 Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide briefed the Security Council at UN Headquarters on the state-of-play in the negotiations on 26 January 2015. The Council expressed its strong support for SASG Eide's efforts, noted the importance of a conducive environment and called for the resumption of structured negotiations without delay. http://bit.ly/15CKroX

 

Security Council calls for resumption of structured negotiations without delay

On 29 January, the United Nations Security Council voted to renew the mandate of the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) for a further six months. The resolution adopted by the Council also expressed support for the ongoing efforts of the Secretary-General's Special Adviser on Cyprus Espen Barth Eide. Noting the importance of a conducive environment, the Council called for a resumption of structured negotiations without delay.

 You can read Security Council Resolution 2197 of 2015 here: http://bit.ly/1DdWYtQ

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